Louisville’s Eye on Climate Change and Economy

Jun 22

Louisville’s Eye on Climate Change and Economy

Climate is an important influence upon our economy and the lifestyles of people in communities throughout Kentucky. However, climate is variable. The city of Louisville recently analyzed periods of warming and cooling which occurred in the past Century, along with precipitation data. Kentucky’s climate has been warming since the most recent cool period of the 1960 through the 70’s. The Metropolitan Sewer District board is reviewing a possible rate increase to help cover some $1 billion in capital projects.  Recent reports show how the frequency of intense storms-those dropping three inches of rain or more-have doubled within the last decade with experts warning of global warming which would subsequently stir up bigger storms, notwithstanding the longer periods of drought.  Weather radar that has been studied shows the frequency of three-inch rains in local areas that are expected to increase from one every 2.6 years to one every year. Although, rainfall totals can vary widely across the county during any storm. With more flooding events likely, the city is recommending upgrades, county-wide, improving drainage system capabilities. A side note…When flooding occurs the flood pumping stations can be useful in order to pump out stored rainy sewage waters. Such is the case for the nearly 65-year-old Paddy’s Run Flood Pumping Station in West Louisville. The station may now run for months in a year, instead of only a few days a year as it is has been a vital component of recent wet weather events. More than half of the 16 flood pumping stations are beyond their 50-year designed lifespan. The expected increase will also address the pumping stations and there current state of usefulness. Coming soon: Perma-Liner Industries is busy making plans for you. We’re planning a “Trenchless Tour” on July 27th in the New England area. We’ll be posting more information on this spectacular event…stay...

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Creative Rain Barrels Fosters Sewer Sensibility

May 17

Creative Rain Barrels Fosters Sewer Sensibility

Conservation planners in McCracken County recently organized a whimsical arts and crafts project in order to put a spin on sustainable water practices. The Artistic Rain Barrel Partnership Project was initiated with the help of talented high school students. With skillfully crafted designs, rain barrels were painted and transformed in order to draw attention and commitment to the use of rain barrels within the community. Rain barrels can save most homeowners approximately 1,300 gallons of water during the peak summer months. Relying more heavily on rain barrels will assist in the reduction of the amount of water entering the County’s inundated storm water system. The project was sponsored to help meet Small Municipal Separate Storm Sewer Permit requirements of public education and outreach, public involvement, and good housekeeping and pollution prevention. Fun fact:  Derby Day is often synonymous with gardening season in Kentucky. So it’s that time of year again, along with a few suggestions for decorative container planting!  First, you’ll want to start with a minimum (12-inch) diameter container. A mistake would be to put too many plants in too small a container. Allow enough room for them to grow. Plant one variety per container and mix-and-match the containers. For the planting mix, it’s important to get it right so you’ll have a successful planting experience and plush garden. You may choose to use premixed with slow-release fertilizer that can greatly reduce the toil and improve the quality of your plants. An added advantage is that the slow-release fertilizers result in far fewer nutrients flowing out of the bottom of your container, down the driveway, into the storm sewer and, eventually, right into the local creek. Important reminder: when was the last time you had your sewer line inspected? A damaged or broken line can cause sewage to leak into the soil, creating a significant risk to the environment with sewage potentially leaking into rivers, lakes and the oceans in certain...

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Somerset and Ferguson Join Forces on Sewer Upgrades

Apr 26

Somerset and Ferguson Join Forces on Sewer Upgrades

The city of Somerset has plans to expand the Ferguson sewer system.  Currently, considerations for funding the sewer line expansion are underway.  In addition to other potential funding, Somerset received a low-interest loan and grant which will be directly applied toward the sewer system upgrades. The to-be-installed 20,500 feet of 8-inch gravity sewer lines will serve 153 customers and include 73 manholes and two lift stations. The existing sewage collection lines in Ferguson are outdated and have reached the end of their useful capacity, with the original system being installed nearly 60 years ago. The sewerage system expansion project is predominantly planned for residences east of Murphy Avenue. The city expects the upgrade to benefit, not only the environment, but the economy as well.  After negotiations, which subsequently lead to an agreement between the two cities, sewage from Ferguson is treated by Somerset’s sewage treatment plant. Did you know the city of Louisville is considered a heat island, which is a city that is significantly warmer than its surrounding areas? A study was recently conducted to review solutions to the higher than normal temperatures. In some areas, it can be up to ten degrees higher than others. The problem this poses, in addition to costlier utility bills, is serious health issues. After the fact-finding was completed, recommendations were given to reduce the heat island through simple, yet effective strategies. The two main ideas include either cooling or greening.  Installing cool roofs, especially on commercial buildings that have flat roofs, is an option. Cool roofs are white or light-colored as opposed to the traditional black roof. Another option is to install green roofs that use plants and grasses, rather than rubber or tar. A green roof has the added benefit of improving air quality, soaking up rain water, and keeping it out of the sewer system. Certified Installers take note: Perma-Liner Industries would like to invite you to our Refresher Training (Perma-Lateral™ specific) that will take place on July 12th and 13th at our Clearwater facility!! Please plan on attending. Register by calling 1-866-336-2568 or Click Here! See you...

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Hustonville Gets the Go-Ahead for Sewer Upgrades

Apr 12

Hustonville Gets the Go-Ahead for Sewer Upgrades

The County of Lincoln has begun a sewer rehabilitation project that has been in the making for several years. The project, in its entirety, is expected to cost upwards of $5 million. Much of the expense will be paid for in grants and loans. The timeframe for the sewer upgrades will be approximately one year, with a probability of completion prior to that. Once the city completes the project the connections to the sewer from residences can be at the assistance of a certified plumber. Notification letters will be sent to homeowners regarding landscaping and what to do to protect it from the ongoing repairs. The district will construct sewer taps for customers’ homes as part of the project, including crossing streets with pipes if necessary, at no cost to the customers. The City of Hustonville will also inspect each sewer connection at a fee of $100 and customers will need to notify the Hustonville Water Office once construction of their sewer pipes is complete. Once sewers are connected to the new system, households are instructed to pump and disconnect old septic tanks from the home. Perma-Liner Industries wants to help you with your connections to the sewer by recommending one of our certified professionals. For the best referral in the business please give us a call. We’ll put you in touch with the right person for your plumbing needs, making it easier for you to focus on your busy schedule by handing the job to the most qualified plumbers in your city. Call us for more information: 1-866-336-2568 or online www.perma-liner.com. We’ll be there for you! Save the Dates: Perma-Liner Industries has a lineup of events for you to attend!  All are invited to come to one, or if you’re adventurous, all of our LIVE DEMOS coming up in April and May. You can go to www.perma-liner.com to register and find out more but first…here are the dates and locations to save: We’ll be in Seattle April 27th, Chicago May 4th and Philadelphia May 18th. You can expect to have our knowledgeable staff showing you the latest CIPP technology. We want to see you...

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Cherokee Triangle and Beargrass Creek Basin

Mar 08

Cherokee Triangle and Beargrass Creek Basin

The Cherokee Triangle Historic District is a vibrant neighborhood two miles from the center of downtown Louisville. Alongside a lively commercial district, residents are within walking distance of an assortment of coffee shops, restaurants, movie theatres, boutiques, antique stores, and amenities like the hardware store, grocery and book sellers. Mature trees, some one hundred years old, line the streets, providing shade and beauty. Currently, the city is planning a public meeting to discuss the benefits of the Interstate 64/Grinstead Drive Storage Basin which will be underground and covered. A small building above it will include pumps and equipment for operation. Input from the neighbors, at public meetings and online, will determine the specific details of the design that will be implemented. This basin will offer Beargrass Creek protection from combined sewer overflows. This creek is a combination of several forks of the creek in Jefferson County. Proposed and existing storage basins, throughout the city, are intended to retain the mixture of rainwater and sewage until the rain subsides, and then gradually release it back into the sewer system for treatment. At the meeting scheduled for this month, the Sewer District will provide information about the conceptual design phase of the project, and offer an opportunity for ideas and comments. This basin will greatly lessen the occurrence of untreated sewage entering Beargrass Creek during rain events. Louisville, have you registered yet for the NASTT’s No-Dig Show? It’s being held this month in Dallas. The NASTT No-Dig show is the largest trenchless technology conference in North America. Professionals attend to learn new techniques that will save money and improve infrastructure. We’ll have many fascinating, informative demo’s on the latest trenchless technologies along with exhibits, products and resources on all of our services locally and nationwide. You won’t want to miss it! Location: Gaylord Texan Hotel & Convention Center/ March 20th-24th 1501 Gaylord Trail Grapevine, TX...

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Buying a Home in Crescent Hill and Beyond

Feb 05

Buying a Home in Crescent Hill and Beyond

Whether buying or selling a home, there are many things to prepare for and it can seem like a daunting task. Louisville has beautiful homes with aesthetic appeal, such as the Crescent Hill area, which makes a home buying experience all the more pleasing. There are important steps that should be taken before buying a home to ensure the best outcome.  Buyers should hire a professional inspector to examine the house. The inspector will assess the structure and mechanics of the house, including the foundation, roof, doors, windows, ceilings, walls, floors, plumbing, electrical systems, heating, air conditioning, wells and sewer lines. An inspection will point out any problems or potential hazards as well as make suggestions about maintenance. So knowing what to look for is key. Many house paints built before 1978 contained lead paint, which can cause significant health problems to infants, children and women of childbearing age. While use of the paint has stopped, many older homes still contain lead paint. If your home was built before 1978, you might want to consider having a lead-based paint inspection particularly if the paint appears to be cracking or chalking. Of all the things that homebuyers overlook, the sewer is at the top. Many inspectors will refer you to a sewer scope company since this runs outside their area of expertise. A sewer scope is a worthwhile investment for homes that are 20 years or older with pipes that could be blocked by tree roots. The upfront cost for a sewer scope will run from $85 to $300, but it can save you thousands on replacing a sewer line down the road. Clogs and slow flushing or draining can be anything from build-up at the trap to tree roots punching through your sewer lines. Happy House...

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Louisville’s 2016 Budget for Water Main Restoration

Jan 13

Louisville’s 2016 Budget for Water Main Restoration

The Louisville Water Department has made important advancements in order to improve the functioning of the water systems. The current goal is to reduce the number of annual main breaks to less than 635 breaks per year. There are approximately 4,200 miles of water main in the system, ranging in size from six-inches in diameter to 60-inches.  Louisville Water will spend $21 million to inspect, repair and replace mains in its service area after the Board of Waterworks approved a $3 million increase in the money for infrastructure projects as part of the company’s 2016 budget. The estimated expense will be $12.4 million on the smaller pipes in the system and $8.9 million on the large transmission mains. For the larger mains, engineers will use robotic technology that moves through a main while it’s delivering water. Rates continue to be some of the lowest in the region. This year, the average price for a family using 5,000 gallons of water a month will be $23.77. This represents a 20-cent increase for each week or 80-cents a month. Louisville infrastructure dates back to 1860 and there is still one section of the original pipe in place. Louisville, SAVE THE DATE!! Perma-Liner Industries cordially invites you to the annual WWETT show! The Water & Wastewater Equipment, Treatment & Transport Show is happening on February 17th– 20th at the Indiana Convention Center.  You can expect to be well informed with hundreds of exhibits, educational sessions, entertainment, networking, and live demonstrations. Meet you there! Convention Center 100 South Capitol Ave. Indianapolis, IN 46225 U.S.A. This is the largest annual trade show of its kind, the WWETT Show attracts some 14,000 environmental service professionals and exhibitor personnel from 53 countries. Register now and...

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