Cured-In-Place-Pipelining Demonstration Days July 18 – 19

Jul 18

Cured-In-Place-Pipelining Demonstration Days July 18 – 19

Perma-Liner Industries, LLC. to Hold Live Cured-In-Place-Pipelining Demonstration Days and Educational Sessions Open House will be held in Anaheim, Cali. on July 18 – 19 ANAHEIM, Cali. – With state-of-the-art technology options, it is not necessary to dig up aging or failing pipes to repair them. There is an efficient and cost-effective way to repair these pipes called the Cured-In-Place-Pipe (CIPP) method. Perma-Liner™ Industries, LLC. (“Perma-Liner”), the leading manufacturer and supplier of trenchless pipeline rehabilitation equipment and materials in North America, is holding an Open House from 9 a.m. – 4 p.m. on July 18 – 19 at its Anaheim, Cali. facility located at 1910 E. Wright Cir. Throughout the multi-day event, company professionals will provide information about Perma-Liner and the technology the company is known for nationwide, which include the Patented Perma-Lateral Lining System, Sectional Point Repair, Perma-Main™ Continuous Lining Top Gun™ and InnerSeal™ Lateral Connection Solution. Attendees will have the opportunity to view and interact with Perma-Liner materials and equipment while also observing live demonstrations in the Anaheim facility. Additionally, the company’s turn-key trailer systems will be onsite so attendees can learn how the materials are Q/A tested and installed using Perma-Liner Installation Methods. The same certified installation methods are used by municipal agencies, drain cleaners, plumbers, and municipal contractors worldwide. During the two-day event, Perma-Liner will unveil a new technology that will join its already robust catalog of equipment and materials. This will be the first time the public will get a look at the company’s newest technology. Anyone interested in learning more about the technology, looking for a certified Perma-Liner installer, or becoming a certified installer is invited to attend. To attend, complete the registration form ### About Perma-Liner™ Industries, LLC. Perma-Liner (PLI) is the leading manufacturer and supplier of trenchless pipeline rehabilitation equipment and materials in North America. Since 1999, PLI has developed systems to rehabilitate existing sewer systems without excavation. To learn more about Perma-Liner, visit...

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Epoxy vinyl ester resin brings many advantages to CIPP industry

Jul 09

Epoxy vinyl ester resin brings many advantages to CIPP industry

Perma-Liner™ Industries, LLC. (“Perma-Liner”), the leading manufacturer and supplier of trenchless pipeline rehabilitation equipment and materials in North America, is introducing a new high-performance epoxy vinyl ester resin called Perma-Liner™ Vinyl Ester. The resin is Bisphenol-A Epoxy-based dissolved in styrene and is available now for purchase. “We are excited to introduce our newest resin into our already broad spectrum of products,” said Jerry D’Hulster, president of Perma-Liner Industries, LLC. “The high-performance epoxy vinyl ester resin offers an excellent balance of corrosion and performance properties. It will allow Perma-Liner to expand to new markets with its unique capabilities.” The new resin provides the corrosion resistance, durability and toughness that is required within the CIPP industry. When it comes to certain specific applications where fluid temperature is relatively higher, the resin has an advantage over epoxy. The demanding needs of many applications including high pressure and/or corrosive environments are also met with the Perma-Liner™ Vinyl Ester. Perma-Liner’s newest product’s molecular architecture delivers a number of benefits, including superior mechanical properties, excellent catalyzed pot life, and meets the requirements of California Greenbook Pickle Jar Test. There is another key benefit of the new resin: less expensive than the Epoxy...

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America’s Failing Water Infrastructure: There are Ways We Can Begin to Fix It

Jun 06

America’s Failing Water Infrastructure: There are Ways We Can Begin to Fix It

There are many variables threatening America’s water from pollution issues and aging infrastructure to raising costs and droughts and rainfall patterns as the climate changes. The U.S. used to be a leader when it came to water infrastructure and management. Now, the U.S. is lagging behind receiving D ratings for dams, drinking water and wastewater. It’s time to start focuses on possible solutions to curb these issues – the U.S. can get A ratings and below are some of the solutions that may get the nation where it needs to be. It starts with creating a national-level governance. Water technically has no boundaries and is very good at sometimes ignoring the municipal boundaries it does have. So what does this mean? One town’s water use or sewage can affect other cities or states that rely on the same water supply. That’s why many countries have a national water authority or commission that oversees water management across the country. The U.S. does not and we’re exactly the opposite. Our nation’s water supply is managed by individual municipalities each doing their own thing. This creates numerous hurdles to climb and makes it difficult to initiate and complete regional projects. To do almost anything, there needs to be a budget and that’s the case with water infrastructure. The government spends only two percent of its GDP on infrastructure, and water infrastructure makes up just a part of that. The U.S. is spending less than Vietnam, Mexico, and Chile. If the U.S. wants nice things, like a water infrastructure that does not fail us, then the U.S. has to be willing to pay for them. One possible solution that most do not consider is the private investor sector. Many investors are interested in investing in water-related issues, but they want to know more about the social and environmental effects their investments will have. The problem is that there are a lot of inconsistencies in how companies report these estimates. It has been suggested that investors, academics and regulators need to team up to create a standardized system of evaluating the impacts of sustainable investments. Another challenge is getting investors to understand how complex and important water is, since it affects agriculture and many...

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Louisville’s Magnum Opus: Eastern Parkway’s Slip lining Project

Jun 26

Louisville’s Magnum Opus: Eastern Parkway’s Slip lining Project

The city of Louisville is not alone in its vast efforts to rehabilitate the sewer systems as many throughout the nation are aging and outdated. That said, not all infrastructures are created equal. An infrastructure replacement project can be extensive and troubling when costs are passed onto the taxpayers. But what about other, more tangible inconveniences such as traffic delays and pesky travel detours and re-routings? The city has found a way to keep such slights far from the unsuspecting traveler and homeowner. While the city is currently replacing over six miles of sewer pipeline, there has been little impact on neighborhoods and residents. A multi-million dollar plan is underway and the location is the Eastern Parkway. Interestingly, the pipeline to be replaced is being slip lined- a pipe within a pipe-thereby eliminating the need to excavate. The pipeline being replaced is a 48 in. cast iron pipe and is nearly a century old. The pipeline services the Crescent Hill area and has had several cracks and leaks during recent years. The Eastern Parkway is the largest water infrastructure project in Louisville-to date, as well as the first time the city has used slip lining for its pipelining projects. This overhaul primarily addresses the solutions needed to keep neighborhoods in Louisville and Jefferson County protected, as heavy storms have caused increased incidences of flooding to hundreds of homes. Louisville, Perma-Liner Industries would like to invite you to our exciting summer event! If you missed our Open House this month in California, no worries! Come to our Delaware Open House next month! Stay tuned for all of the details. It’s taking place from July 18th-20th. We want to see you there, and as always, we’ll have our experienced crew demonstrating equipment and all the latest in CIPP. Make a plan to attend and see you...

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Louisville’s Rain Surge: Limited Water Usage Lessens Impact on Sewer

Mar 01

Louisville’s Rain Surge: Limited Water Usage Lessens Impact on Sewer

Louisville, it’s raining and pouring! The city has experienced severe storms which not only lead to school closures but flooding, power outages, and ill-prepared driving conditions. As 60 mile-per-hour winds and quarter-sized hail sped through the city, area residents have lost power on both sides of the Ohio River, including as many as 13,000 in Jefferson and Oldham Counties, and nearly 900 in Floyd County. Be advised when traveling that the worst of the street flooding was reported on Taylor Boulevard near Iroquois High School. Additionally, Billtown Road pumping station has received over 2.60 inches of rain. Clogged storm drains are also being addressed. When heavy rain such as this occurs, it is recommended that homeowners decrease their water usage. Waiting up to 24 hours to run your dishwasher or do laundry can lessen the impact on a- already overloaded- sewer system. Louisville, did you know? There is a way homeowners can help minimize the amount of rainwater that enters the community’s wastewater system. The city is offering free programs to help you modify and correct improperly installed drainage connections. The most popular of these programs is the Downspout Disconnection Program. By enrolling in this program, you can receive a one-time incentive of $100 for each downspout disconnected from the wastewater system on your property. More Bluegrass News: the City of Frankfort was recently approved for several loans to assist in the overhaul of sanitary sewer and storm water systems throughout the city. Frankfort has approximately 14,000 customers and treats wastewater for an area of Woodford County that includes 21 customers. The authorized loans will be used to rehabilitate and replace up to 41,500 linear feet of old sewer lines with 12 to 24 inch PVC gravity lines. With this, flooding issues on specific roadways within the city will be eradicated. The project will also eliminate the persisting sanitary sewer overflows and reduce the inflow/infiltration into the sewer system....

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Louisville Builds a Mega Sewer to Reduce Overflows

Dec 12

Louisville Builds a Mega Sewer to Reduce Overflows

Louisville has an extensive sewer system and the city has been obliged to bring their sewer systems up to date in order to withstand the occurrences of heavy rain events. In the recent past, storms have produced overflows and conditions that have precluded this required obligation. Nearby residents can expect ongoing construction of a high-tech, massive tunnel system complete with a 20 million gallon sewage storage basin designed to sharply reduce bacteria-laden overflows into the Ohio River. All of the construction in process will necessitate some of the area parks, specifically Shawnee Park, to be unavailable for months to come. Nearby roadways will also limited thoroughfare during this time. The spacious and historic park will be vastly renewed with over $2 million in upgrades, including redesigned athletic fields for the sports enthusiast. There will also be additions that will include open-air pavilions and more. The current project is expected to be completed within the next four years. An underground basin will collect and temporarily store rain and sewage from three overflow locations that now dump on average 115 million gallons into the Ohio River. The sewer overflows that are produced from heavy rain are expected to drastically decrease by at least 75% upon completion of the project. The tunnel will serve nine combined storm and sewage overflow points. Additionally, some trees will be removed and replaced with appropriate landscaping.  This western Louisville Park has been in line for a major overhaul for some time and is now being renovated entirely. The underground basin will be 480 feet by 208 feet, and 55 feet deep-deep enough to enclose a five-story building. Interesting fact: Louisville has had 11 storms with 3 inches or more of rain in 24 hours in the last decade. Contact us today for all your pipelining needs:...

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