Louisville’s Much Ado: Always Dreaming and Project Win for Sewers

May 08

Louisville’s Much Ado: Always Dreaming and Project Win for Sewers

For the city of Louisville, the Kentucky Derby is all the rage with fun, fanfare and spectacular colts and fillies. This not-to-be-missed event is a race that runs the distance of one and one-quarter miles long, and it is run on the dirt racetrack at Churchill Downs. Colts in the race carry 126 pounds and fillies in the race carry 121 pounds. Taking place on the first Saturday in May every year, there are many hands involved in prep work. This year’s crowd drew over 158,000 onlookers. The Derby is the longest continually held sporting event in America. The event this year was a wet go around with rain and mud but ‘Always Dreaming’ took the win anyway. Way to go! But there’s also another win for the Derby City. This one is called ‘Project Win’; specifically designed to control sewer overflows and improve water quality in Louisville. The earliest sewers in Louisville were built in the 1800’s to drain storm water into a river or stream after a rain event.  When indoor plumbing became common in Louisville homes, a sanitary sewer became necessary to drain wastewater.  Projects to accomplish the most effective and stable drainage system for the city have been at the forefront of city organizers for many years.  Additionally-expected during summer-a major reconstruction project will take place for the city. A large expansion of the downtown Waterfront Park on the Ohio River banks will include a 22-acre site plan with the intent to increase green infrastructure. Residents can also expect the site to incorporate interactive features that will connect Portland and downtown, becoming a regional attraction for visitors to downtown in West Louisville from 10th Street to Rowan Street. The project has been years in the making and will enhance the quality of life for residents looking for an enhanced waterfront experience. It will also serve as an impetus for economic development and improved...

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Louisville’s Rain Surge: Limited Water Usage Lessens Impact on Sewer

Mar 01

Louisville’s Rain Surge: Limited Water Usage Lessens Impact on Sewer

Louisville, it’s raining and pouring! The city has experienced severe storms which not only lead to school closures but flooding, power outages, and ill-prepared driving conditions. As 60 mile-per-hour winds and quarter-sized hail sped through the city, area residents have lost power on both sides of the Ohio River, including as many as 13,000 in Jefferson and Oldham Counties, and nearly 900 in Floyd County. Be advised when traveling that the worst of the street flooding was reported on Taylor Boulevard near Iroquois High School. Additionally, Billtown Road pumping station has received over 2.60 inches of rain. Clogged storm drains are also being addressed. When heavy rain such as this occurs, it is recommended that homeowners decrease their water usage. Waiting up to 24 hours to run your dishwasher or do laundry can lessen the impact on a- already overloaded- sewer system. Louisville, did you know? There is a way homeowners can help minimize the amount of rainwater that enters the community’s wastewater system. The city is offering free programs to help you modify and correct improperly installed drainage connections. The most popular of these programs is the Downspout Disconnection Program. By enrolling in this program, you can receive a one-time incentive of $100 for each downspout disconnected from the wastewater system on your property. More Bluegrass News: the City of Frankfort was recently approved for several loans to assist in the overhaul of sanitary sewer and storm water systems throughout the city. Frankfort has approximately 14,000 customers and treats wastewater for an area of Woodford County that includes 21 customers. The authorized loans will be used to rehabilitate and replace up to 41,500 linear feet of old sewer lines with 12 to 24 inch PVC gravity lines. With this, flooding issues on specific roadways within the city will be eradicated. The project will also eliminate the persisting sanitary sewer overflows and reduce the inflow/infiltration into the sewer system....

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Louisville Builds a Mega Sewer to Reduce Overflows

Dec 12

Louisville Builds a Mega Sewer to Reduce Overflows

Louisville has an extensive sewer system and the city has been obliged to bring their sewer systems up to date in order to withstand the occurrences of heavy rain events. In the recent past, storms have produced overflows and conditions that have precluded this required obligation. Nearby residents can expect ongoing construction of a high-tech, massive tunnel system complete with a 20 million gallon sewage storage basin designed to sharply reduce bacteria-laden overflows into the Ohio River. All of the construction in process will necessitate some of the area parks, specifically Shawnee Park, to be unavailable for months to come. Nearby roadways will also limited thoroughfare during this time. The spacious and historic park will be vastly renewed with over $2 million in upgrades, including redesigned athletic fields for the sports enthusiast. There will also be additions that will include open-air pavilions and more. The current project is expected to be completed within the next four years. An underground basin will collect and temporarily store rain and sewage from three overflow locations that now dump on average 115 million gallons into the Ohio River. The sewer overflows that are produced from heavy rain are expected to drastically decrease by at least 75% upon completion of the project. The tunnel will serve nine combined storm and sewage overflow points. Additionally, some trees will be removed and replaced with appropriate landscaping.  This western Louisville Park has been in line for a major overhaul for some time and is now being renovated entirely. The underground basin will be 480 feet by 208 feet, and 55 feet deep-deep enough to enclose a five-story building. Interesting fact: Louisville has had 11 storms with 3 inches or more of rain in 24 hours in the last decade. Contact us today for all your pipelining needs:...

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Louisville’s Eye on Climate Change and Economy

Jun 22

Louisville’s Eye on Climate Change and Economy

Climate is an important influence upon our economy and the lifestyles of people in communities throughout Kentucky. However, climate is variable. The city of Louisville recently analyzed periods of warming and cooling which occurred in the past Century, along with precipitation data. Kentucky’s climate has been warming since the most recent cool period of the 1960 through the 70’s. The Metropolitan Sewer District board is reviewing a possible rate increase to help cover some $1 billion in capital projects.  Recent reports show how the frequency of intense storms-those dropping three inches of rain or more-have doubled within the last decade with experts warning of global warming which would subsequently stir up bigger storms, notwithstanding the longer periods of drought.  Weather radar that has been studied shows the frequency of three-inch rains in local areas that are expected to increase from one every 2.6 years to one every year. Although, rainfall totals can vary widely across the county during any storm. With more flooding events likely, the city is recommending upgrades, county-wide, improving drainage system capabilities. A side note…When flooding occurs the flood pumping stations can be useful in order to pump out stored rainy sewage waters. Such is the case for the nearly 65-year-old Paddy’s Run Flood Pumping Station in West Louisville. The station may now run for months in a year, instead of only a few days a year as it is has been a vital component of recent wet weather events. More than half of the 16 flood pumping stations are beyond their 50-year designed lifespan. The expected increase will also address the pumping stations and there current state of usefulness. Coming soon: Perma-Liner Industries is busy making plans for you. We’re planning a “Trenchless Tour” on July 27th in the New England area. We’ll be posting more information on this spectacular event…stay...

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Hustonville Gets the Go-Ahead for Sewer Upgrades

Apr 12

Hustonville Gets the Go-Ahead for Sewer Upgrades

The County of Lincoln has begun a sewer rehabilitation project that has been in the making for several years. The project, in its entirety, is expected to cost upwards of $5 million. Much of the expense will be paid for in grants and loans. The timeframe for the sewer upgrades will be approximately one year, with a probability of completion prior to that. Once the city completes the project the connections to the sewer from residences can be at the assistance of a certified plumber. Notification letters will be sent to homeowners regarding landscaping and what to do to protect it from the ongoing repairs. The district will construct sewer taps for customers’ homes as part of the project, including crossing streets with pipes if necessary, at no cost to the customers. The City of Hustonville will also inspect each sewer connection at a fee of $100 and customers will need to notify the Hustonville Water Office once construction of their sewer pipes is complete. Once sewers are connected to the new system, households are instructed to pump and disconnect old septic tanks from the home. Perma-Liner Industries wants to help you with your connections to the sewer by recommending one of our certified professionals. For the best referral in the business please give us a call. We’ll put you in touch with the right person for your plumbing needs, making it easier for you to focus on your busy schedule by handing the job to the most qualified plumbers in your city. Call us for more information: 1-866-336-2568 or online www.perma-liner.com. We’ll be there for you! Save the Dates: Perma-Liner Industries has a lineup of events for you to attend!  All are invited to come to one, or if you’re adventurous, all of our LIVE DEMOS coming up in April and May. You can go to www.perma-liner.com to register and find out more but first…here are the dates and locations to save: We’ll be in Seattle April 27th, Chicago May 4th and Philadelphia May 18th. You can expect to have our knowledgeable staff showing you the latest CIPP technology. We want to see you...

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Buying a Home in Crescent Hill and Beyond

Feb 05

Buying a Home in Crescent Hill and Beyond

Whether buying or selling a home, there are many things to prepare for and it can seem like a daunting task. Louisville has beautiful homes with aesthetic appeal, such as the Crescent Hill area, which makes a home buying experience all the more pleasing. There are important steps that should be taken before buying a home to ensure the best outcome.  Buyers should hire a professional inspector to examine the house. The inspector will assess the structure and mechanics of the house, including the foundation, roof, doors, windows, ceilings, walls, floors, plumbing, electrical systems, heating, air conditioning, wells and sewer lines. An inspection will point out any problems or potential hazards as well as make suggestions about maintenance. So knowing what to look for is key. Many house paints built before 1978 contained lead paint, which can cause significant health problems to infants, children and women of childbearing age. While use of the paint has stopped, many older homes still contain lead paint. If your home was built before 1978, you might want to consider having a lead-based paint inspection particularly if the paint appears to be cracking or chalking. Of all the things that homebuyers overlook, the sewer is at the top. Many inspectors will refer you to a sewer scope company since this runs outside their area of expertise. A sewer scope is a worthwhile investment for homes that are 20 years or older with pipes that could be blocked by tree roots. The upfront cost for a sewer scope will run from $85 to $300, but it can save you thousands on replacing a sewer line down the road. Clogs and slow flushing or draining can be anything from build-up at the trap to tree roots punching through your sewer lines. Happy House...

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