Indianapolis Suburbs Assist Environment with Man-Made Strategies

Nov 11

Indianapolis Suburbs Assist Environment with Man-Made Strategies

Many cities throughout the Midwest are heeding the call to keep the environment in which we live protected and free of hazardous pollutants. A junkyard facility in the suburbs of Indianapolis is mapping out a strategy to do just that. The city is projecting an expense of nearly $1.5 million to build a storm water treatment plant, as well as holding ponds, consisting of a million-gallon capacity. This is an inventive means to stop years of pollution in its tracks and help support the environment. Heavy rains washing off roads, parking lots and buildings are placing a burden on shared sewer and storm pipes, particularly in the older parts of Louisville. This has also caused massive spills to Beargrass Creek and the Ohio River, totaling over 5 billion gallons as recent as last year. Surprisingly, this is approximately 1 billion gallons more than an estimated 10-year average.  Historically, rain events are analyzed in terms of their chances of occurring in any single year. For instance, a 100-year storm would have a 1 percent chance of happening in any year. By contrast, a five-year storm would have a 20 percent chance of occurring in any year, while a two-year storm would have a 50 percent chance. The District is also now designing seven giant underground storage basins and a 2.5-mile-long tunnel to temporarily hold the mixture of rain and sewage for treatment later. Fortunately, in the years ahead these capacity issues will be alleviated as the city is on the verge of its best solution to address an overloaded system with an organized system. Save the date! Perma-Liner Industries is preparing for our California Trenchless Tour! It’s taking place in Concord, California on December 6th-8th. For details on all the educational demos on CIPP and events we’ve planned for you, please visit our website or call us: www.perma-liner.com /...

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Creative Rain Barrels Fosters Sewer Sensibility

May 17

Creative Rain Barrels Fosters Sewer Sensibility

Conservation planners in McCracken County recently organized a whimsical arts and crafts project in order to put a spin on sustainable water practices. The Artistic Rain Barrel Partnership Project was initiated with the help of talented high school students. With skillfully crafted designs, rain barrels were painted and transformed in order to draw attention and commitment to the use of rain barrels within the community. Rain barrels can save most homeowners approximately 1,300 gallons of water during the peak summer months. Relying more heavily on rain barrels will assist in the reduction of the amount of water entering the County’s inundated storm water system. The project was sponsored to help meet Small Municipal Separate Storm Sewer Permit requirements of public education and outreach, public involvement, and good housekeeping and pollution prevention. Fun fact:  Derby Day is often synonymous with gardening season in Kentucky. So it’s that time of year again, along with a few suggestions for decorative container planting!  First, you’ll want to start with a minimum (12-inch) diameter container. A mistake would be to put too many plants in too small a container. Allow enough room for them to grow. Plant one variety per container and mix-and-match the containers. For the planting mix, it’s important to get it right so you’ll have a successful planting experience and plush garden. You may choose to use premixed with slow-release fertilizer that can greatly reduce the toil and improve the quality of your plants. An added advantage is that the slow-release fertilizers result in far fewer nutrients flowing out of the bottom of your container, down the driveway, into the storm sewer and, eventually, right into the local creek. Important reminder: when was the last time you had your sewer line inspected? A damaged or broken line can cause sewage to leak into the soil, creating a significant risk to the environment with sewage potentially leaking into rivers, lakes and the oceans in certain...

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Go for the Green: University of Louisville’s Sustainability

Nov 02

Go for the Green: University of Louisville’s Sustainability

University of Louisville is working with Louisville’s Metropolitan Sewer District (MSD) on a variety of green infrastructure projects to help keep storm water runoff out of the combined sewer system. In the past, every raindrop that hit U of L’s rooftops (over 2.2 million square feet on Belknap campus alone) and pavements was channeled into the same sewer system that handles sewage. The University has three campuses. The 287-acre Belknap Campus is three miles from downtown Louisville and houses seven of the university’s 12 colleges and schools.  The sewer system can potentially handle storm water from U of L, but the treatment plants at the end of the pipe often cannot.  This leads to unsavory conditions, as well as, dangerous releases of untreated sewage into the Ohio River, which poses a threat to human health and ecological integrity. The University has pursued means of lessening the risk of flood and reducing the campus’ contribution to the problem by diverting storm water from the sewer system all together, through infiltration and rainwater harvesting projects, or by slowing its release through water absorbing changes to the campus landscape. Around campus, there are disconnected downspouts, installed vegetated green roofs, and built rain gardens and bioswales to facilitate groundwater recharge through infiltration. In recent years, U of L made several changes to campus landscaping, parking lots and rooftops, with the help of $1.25 million in cost-sharing from the Metropolitan Sewer District. This year, MSD confirmed that U of L’s projects are diverting about 72 million gallons of storm water every year. This significant investment will essentially pay for itself by helping prevent millions of dollars in future flood damage. MSD’s investment in Belknap campus storm water projects is part of an $850 million agreement that MSD made in federal court with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and state regulators to reduce the incidence of combined sewer overflows into waterways during storm...

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